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Blackburn

Blackburn Aeroplane and Motor Co. Ltd
Blackburn Aircraft Ltd.
Blackburn & General Aircraft Ltd
Blackburn Aircraft Ltd.


History

Robert Blackburn was born on 26 March 1885 in Kirkstall, Leeds, Yorkshire, the son of George Blackburn, works manager for Thomas Green and Sons Ltd, Smithfield Iron Works. He attended Leeds Modern School and graduated in engineering at the University of Leeds in 1906, whereupon he joined his father’s drawing office.

Leaving Thomas Green, Blackburn traveled through Europe, eventually working with a firm of civil engineering consultants in Rouen. The sight of Wilbur Wright flying at Issy in 1908 encouraged Robert Blackburn to leave the company and to devote his life to aeronautics. He took a room in Paris and there designed his first aircraft. With the lay-out complete, he returned to England with hopes of building the machine at the Green premises, but when this was denied and with some financial support from his father, he set up a small workshop in Benson Street, Leeds. In this he was assisted by one of Green’s apprentices, Harry Goodyear.

In April 1909, Blackburn began his trials along the wide stretch of sand between Marske-by-the-Sea and Saltburn on the northeast Yorkshire coast. Painstaking taxying trials continued, but the 35 hp Green gave insufficient power for sustained flight. This first machine was of the ‘Demoiselle’ type, with such weighty items as engine, tanks and pilot, well below the mainplane in order to obtain a low C.G. position, but the disadvantages of such an arrangement were not immediately obvious and on 24 May 1910, the aircraft side slipped, dug in the port wing, writing off the machine.

At Benson Street work began on an entirely new design, this time of the Antoinette type. After construction in Benson Street, it was moved to premises Blackburn rented by the coast at Filey. The machine was first flown at Filey on 8 March 1911 in the hands of Bentfield C. Hucks, who was to become Blackburn’s first test pilot.

Following the success of the second machine, a larger two seat machine, the ‘Mercury’, was designed and the works moved to larger premises in Balm Road, Leeds, which were the former Midland Railway stables. Blackburn, who by now styled himself The Blackburn Aeroplane Company, had also formed the Blackburn Flying School at Filey, initially with Hucks as instructor, eventually moving to Hendon in September 1912 under the management of Harold Blackburn (no relation). Blackburn’s monoplanes gained a good reputation with the school and raised Blackburn’s reputation as one of the eminent designers of the day.

In early 1914, Blackburn became a subcontractor for the manufacture of the B.E.2c and, with the need to move to larger premises, in June formed a limited company, The Blackburn Aeroplane and Motor Co., Ltd., with capital of £20,000 to ‘acquire the business of an aeroplane designer and constructor carried on by R. Blackburn as the Blackburn Aeroplane Co.’ The company moved into a disused roller-skating rink on Roundhay Road, which became the Olympia Works. More government contracts followed for the Sopwith Cuckoo and Baby. Blackburn’s desire to develop his private venture seaplanes led to the acquisition of a site at Brough on the river Humber, and the experimental department moved there in 1916. The same year, the somewhat eccentric designer Harris Booth moved to Blackburn from the Air Department of the Admiralty, where his first project was a heavily-revised version of his AD Scout, the Blackburn Triplane.

In January 1918, the Admiralty issued specification N.1B. In response, Harris Booth designed the Blackburd, a large, three-bay biplane with unswept, unstaggered wings and a slab-sided fuselage, whose simple lines were designed to facilitate rapid production. In 1920, Booth designed an ‘aerial lorry’ to take advantage of the Alula wing designed by the Commercial Aeroplane Wing Syndicate, Ltd.

Meanwhile the air transport firm of North Sea Aerial Navigation Co Ltd. was formed on 23 April 1919 by Robert Blackburn and his brother, Captain Norman William George Blackburn (b. 25 May 1896 in Leeds, Yorkshire, d. 27 January 1966 in Bridlington, Yorks), as a subsidiary of the Blackburn Aeroplane and Motor Company with the objective of providing scheduled services from Soldiers Field in Roundhay Park, Blackburn’s flying ground adjacent to the Olympia Works. Although a few flights were operated using demobbed Kangaroos, Rounday proved to be unsuitable and services were moved to Brough in 1920, with Soldiers Field reverting to its’ original use as a public park. The scheduled service proved to be a fruitless endeavor, but the company tried to stay afloat in the lucrative business of joyriding. Even this, however, eventually fell into a slump and, in order to keep the company going, made it responsible for all of Blackburn’s road transport. This was reflected in the change of name to the North Sea Aerial and General Transport Co. Ltd. at the end of 1920. Associated with the venture was Capt. T. A. Gladstone, who had a distinguished war record and was a flying-boat pilot of outstanding ability. In 1924, while on a tour of Central Africa, he was impressed with the possibilities of an air transport service along the Nile between Khartoum and Kisumu, which is in the north-east corner of Victoria Nyanza. About this time Sir Alan Cobham's firm became interested in the idea of an airline from Cairo to the Cape, and after sundry negotiations they joined forces with the Blackburn group, with the result that Cobham-Blackburn Air Lines, Ltd., were registered. The Africa service was however never to take place and towards the end of 1928 Cobham-Blackburn Air Lines, Ltd., entered into an agreement with Imperial Airways, Ltd., with the result that the resources of the two enterprises were amalgamated and a company was formed known as Imperial Airways (South Africa), Ltd., mainly to protect Imperial Airways' interests in South Africa.

The end of hostilities brought for Blackburn, like most of the aviation industry, a sudden loss of work. Luckily the company had become a major supplier of A.G.S. parts and this, along with production of bodies for cars and motor coaches (and even their own Blackburn car) kept the company afloat. The loss of Soldiers Field also left Blackburn without a suitable flying ground in Leeds, requiring all machines to be taken by road to Brough for final erection and test flying. This far from ideal situation was to continue until 1925 when the decision was made to concentrate all of Blackburn’s activities at Brough, closing down the Olympia works. This, however, proved to be a far from easy exercise, the move not being wholly complete until 1932.

Meanwhile, in 1920, Blackburn submitted a private venture submission for a naval torpedo bomber, designed by Major F.A. Bumpus. Frank Arnold Bumpus was born on 20 March 1886 in Loughborough, Leicestershire and trained as a mechanical engineer, gaining his B.Sc. from Imperial College, London in 1910. He received a Temporary Commission in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve with the rank of Lieutenant in April 1915 and was posted as the resident Air Board representative at Leeds during the war. Following the war he stayed on to become chief designer and, in 1919, was made joint managing director with Robert Blackburn. Bumpus had as his assistant the very capable George Edward Petty, who himself became chief designer in 1937 with Bumpus assuming the role of chief engineer.

Bumpus was responsible for all of Blackburn’s landplane designs up to the Nautilus of 1929, after which Petty assumed that role. The one exception was the little Bluebird touring biplane. Jackson [1] gives responsibility for this to A.C. Thornton but in a letter to Flight of 7 August 1931, Bumpus writes “The original design of the Bluebird was actually the work of Mr. G. E. Petty, who not only produced the original layout, but was also responsible for the whole of the aerodynamic design and the structural scheme and main stressing. At this stage the job was handed over to Mr. Thornton for completion of detail design and installation work”.

Although producing successful landplanes, Blackburn was also very interested in marine aircraft. To that end, in 1923 they secured the services of Major John Douglas Rennie (b. 1879) as float and hull designer, a post he held until his resignation in April 1946. From 1915, Rennie had been Chief Technical Officer to Cmdr. John Porte at Felixtowe, responsible for the engineering of the F-type flying boats. Under Rennie’s leadership, Blackburn produced a series of flying boats from the Iris of 1924 to the unsuccessful B.20 of 1940, his final project being the unbuilt Clydesman of 1945.

In 1924, Robert Blackburn was invited to take over the running of the Greek National Aircraft Factory at Old Phaleron, receiving the first of three contracts for this on 1 July 1925. During Blackburn’s thirteen year tenure, 12 Blackburn Velos, 24 Avro 504N and 10 Armstrong Whitworth Atlas aircraft were produced, alongside a considerable amount of reconditioning.

Also in 1924, the North Sea Aerial and General Transport Co. Ltd. was to return to flying with the award of a contract to form an RAF Reserve training school, which was eventually to become No. 4 Elementary and Reserve Flying Training School (later No. 4 EFTS) in 1935. A subsidiary company, Flying Training Ltd., was formed that same year to operate No. 5 E & RFTS at Hanworth.

In 1934, following the successful application of the Cirrus Hermes powerplant in the Bluebird, the Cirrus Hermes Engineering Co. Ltd transferred its works from Croydon to Brough, with Robert Blackburn becoming chairman. This, along with contracts to support the governments rearmament programme, created a need for extra manufacturing space leading to both expansion at Brough and the reopening of the Olympia works in Leeds. In order to support even larger contracts, Blackburn consolidated all their interests in a new public company, Blackburn Aircraft Ltd., registered on 2 April 1936.

In a move to support further expansion, Blackburn entered into an agreement with the Scottish shipbuilding firm of William Denny and Bros Ltd of Dumbarton to establish a new factory at Dumbarton on land owned by Denny, which was completed in 1937. This new enterprise was put under the leadership of Major Bumpus, with H.J. Steiger, late of General Aircraft, being taken on to assist him. The same year also saw the complete absorption of Cirrus Hermes Engineering into Blackburn, their product from then on being known as Blackburn Cirrus.

The years leading up to the Second World War were predominantly occupied with production of the Shark and development of the Skua and Botha. By the beginning of hostilities, though, the Shark was somewhat outdated and the others were perhaps less successful than hoped for. However, Blackburn did build many other aircraft under subcontract; Brough produced some 635 Fairey Barracuda, 250 Short Sunderland were built at Dumbarton and in 1940 a new factory was built at Sherburn-in-Elmet which produced 1700 Fairey Swordfish under the management of Norman Blackburn. Norman, a Blackburn director since 1920, was put in full charge of all Blackburn factories in Yorkshire from 1944.

In the immediate post war years, as with the end of World War one, an immediate reduction in military orders ensued. Production of the Firebrand was under way at both Brough and Olympia, and from 1948 Blackburn resources were also used for building 125 Percival Prentice trainers for the RAF. However, none of this could keep the existing facilities busy. Olympia and Sherburn were both closed. Brough undertook a variety of non-aviation related fabrication, while Dumbarton, reconstituted as Blackburn (Dumbarton) Ltd., was kept busy building prefabricated houses. Meanwhile, further south, the General Aircraft Co. Ltd was facing problems of a different nature. GAL were in the process of building the prototype GAL.60 tactical transport. If it were to go into production, not only would larger facilities be required, but GAL’s airfield at Hanworh, being only a grass strip, was ill suited for such a large machine.

As a result, the two companies merged to form Blackburn and General Aircraft Ltd., the company registered on 23 February 1949, GAL’s intellectual property having been transferred to the new company as of 1 January. H.V. Gort, managing director of General Aircraft, Ltd., and Capt. Norman Blackburn became joint managing directors in place of Robert Blackburn and Major Bumpus, with Major Bumpus remaining as managing director of Blackburn Aircraft (Dumbarton), Ltd. F.F. Crocombe, chief designer at GAL was appointed to the same position in the amalgamated company. None of these appointments were to last long, however. H.V. Gort and Norman Blackburn ceased as joint managing directors in August of 1950, being replaced by Major Bumpus as acting managing director, himself replaced by Eric Turner in May of 1951. Crocombe left to join Boulton Paul in 1952, to be replaced as chief designer by Barry P. Laight.

In mid-1953, under doctor’s orders, Robert Blackburn went into semi-retirement in Devonshire, where he died on 10 September 1955. Major Bumpus too had retired, and settled in Helensburgh, Dunbartonshire, where he died on 6 April 1980.

The next few years saw significant changes in the company, which by 1958 had reverted to being called Blackburn Aircraft Limited again. The lean times of the 1950s were also coming to an end with design of the highly advanced B.103, later to become the Buccaneer, well established. As part of the governments push to rationalise the aircraft industry, in the beginning of 1960 the Hawker Siddeley Group made a successful takeover bid for Blackburn and in May 1963 the company’s name was change to Hawker Siddeley Aviation, Hawker Blackburn Division. This unwieldy name was not to last and from 12 July 1963 the Blackburn name was lost altogether and Brough was just another facility in the Hawker Siddeley Group.

Company References
  1. Blackburn Aircraft since 1909, A.J. Jackson (Putnam, 1989)
  2. Flight 31 July 1914
  3. Flight 7 August 1931
  4. Flight 12 November 1936
  5. Flight 6 January 1949
  6. Flight 4 May 1950
  7. Flight 3 August 1950
  8. Flight 11 May 1951
  9. Flight 23 September 1955
  10. Flight 11 December 1959
  11. Flight 4 March 1960
  12. ancestry.com



Blackburn Type Designations top

The Alphabetic Sequence
As with most early pioneers of flight, Robert Blackburn unsurprisingly gave no thought to an organized Type Designation system for his early prototypes. By the introduction of the Mercury monoplanes an Alphabetic sequence was in use, the first known application being the Type B for the 1911 Mercury II. This sequence continued up to the Type L of 1914, although only seven of the possible 12 alphabetic identities have been positively identified. From 1914 to 1918 the various Blackburn designs appear to have received no form of Type Designation.

The Mission Designation System
From 1918, probably inspired by the Sopwith system, a Mission Designation System was instigated, beginning with the Type R.T.1 Kangaroo and ending with the R.B.3A Perth of 1931. Surprisingly, neither the Blackburd nor the Sidecar, both of which were later designs than the Kangaroo, used this system. A full list of the Mission Designations, along with the designs to which they applied, is given in the table below. The Chronology Index Number is given to enable a cross reference between this table and the chronologically listed project table given later.

 Type No

 Name

 Year

CIN*

 Type No

 Name

 Year

CIN*

 Type No

 Name

 Year

CIN*

 Class B.T.

Bomber-Torpedo

   Class C.B.

Commercial Boat

   Class T

Torpedo

  
 B.T.1 Beagle 1928

46

 C.B.1  1931

72

 T.1 Swift I 1920

2

 Class C.A.

Commercial

   C.B.2  1928

66

 T.1A Swift II, Swift F 1922

5

 C.A.0  1923

8

 C.B.2F Nile 1930

67

 T.1B Swift III 1923

18

 C.A.01  1923

9

 Class C.Bo.

Civil Boat

   T.O.1  1923

16

 C.A.1 Unknown 

12

 C.Bo.1  1923

14

 T.?? Swift IV 1923

7

 C.A.2  1923

13

 C.Bo.2  1923

15

 T.2 Dart 1921

3

 C.A.02  1923

10

 C.Bo.3  1924

22

 T.3 Velos 1925

33

 C.A.03  1923

11

 C.Bo.4  1924

23

 T.4 Cubaroo 1924

21

 C.A.04  1924

25

 Class D.B.

Dive Bomber

   T.4A Cubaroo 1924

40

 C.A.05  1924

26

 D.B.1 Skua 1937

88

 T.4B Cubaroo 1927

41

 C.A.3  1924

27

 Class F

Fighter

   T.4C Cubaroo 1927

42

 C.A.4  1924

28

 F.1 Turcock 1927

45

 T.5 Ripon 1926

36

 C.A.5  1924

29

 F.2 Lincock 1928

49

 T.6  1927

43

 C.A.6  1924

30

 2F.1 Nautilus 1929

51

 T.7  1927

44

 C.A.7  1924

31

 F.3  1934

84

 T.7A  1929

59

 C.A.8  1924

32

 Class L

Light Aeroplane

   T.7B 3MR4 1929

60

 C.A.9  1928

48

 L.1 Bluebird 1924

24

 T.8 Baffin 1933

79

 C.A.10  1928

47

 Class M

Mailplane

   T.9 Shark I 1933

82

 C.A.11  1929

52

 M.1 Night Mailplane 1923

17

 T.9A Shark II 1935

86

 C.A.11A  1930

62

 Class R

Reconnaissance

   T.9B Shark III 1937

89

 C.A.12  1929

53

 R.1 Blackburn 1922

4

 Class T.C.

Troop Carrier

  
 C.A.13  1929

54

 R.2 Airedale 1924

34

 T.C.1  1929

61

 C.A.14  1929

55

 R.3A Airedale 1926

35

 Class T.R.

Trainer

  
 C.A.15A  1929

56

 Class R.B.

Reconnaissance Boat

   T.R.1 Sprat 1926

37

 C.A.15B  1929

57

 R.B.1 Iris  1926

38

 Unclassified   
 C.A.15C  1932

74

 R.B.2 Sydney 1930

65

  Chilean Type A 1923

6

 C.A.16  1930

63

 R.B.2A  1929

58

  10-Seater 1923

19

 C.A.17  1930

64

 R.B.3 Iris VI 1933

80

  Pellet 1923

20

 C.A.18 Segrave I 1931

69

 R.B.3A Perth 1933

83

  Torp. bomber (M.5/28) 1928

50

 C.A.18/1 Segrave Ambulance 1931

70

 Class R.T.

Reconnaissance Torpedo

   Civil flying boat 1931

68

 C.A.18A Segrave High Tourer 1931

71

 R.T.1

 Kangaroo

 1918

1

  Mailplane (21/28) 1931

73

 C.A.19 Segrave III 1933

81

 Class S

Survey

      
 C.A.19/1 H.S.T.8 1932

75

 S.1  1927

39

    
 C.A.20 Segrave II 1932

76

        
 C.A.20A Segrave II 1932

77

        
 C.A.21  1932

78

        
 C.A.21A H.S.T.10 1936

87

        
 C.A.21B H.S.B.T.10 1935

85

        
*CIN = Chronology Index Number. Note this is not a Blackburn numbering but just an indexing used by this site for convenience.

The B Series
In 1930, the system of Class B Registrations was introduced to enable test flying before the award of a Certificate of Airworthiness. This consisted of a single letter to identify the company, followed by a number. Blackburn were awarded, logically, the letter B and used Class B Registrations B-1 (the C.A.18 Segrave) through B-10 (an engine test bed version of the Bluebird). Thereafter this was adopted as the official Blackburn Type designation System and continued up until the B.130 of 1962. By then the company was part of the Hawker Siddeley Group and, in keeping with the rest of the Groups subsidiaries, changed the prefix from B to P, starting with the P.131. This system was to last beyond the demise of Blackburn as an individual entity and the sequence was retained by the Hawker Siddeley and British Aerospace Brough design offices.

The SBAC System
In 1945 the Society of British Aircraft Constructors introduced a universal designation system and Blackburn adopted this, although erratically and in parallel with its B series rather than replacing it. The company appears to have dropped use of this system by 1955.



Project Data top
The Alphabetic Sequence

Project No

Type No

Name

Alternative Name(s)

Year

Spec

Status

Qty

Description

References

   1909 Monoplane Heavy Type Monoplane 1909  Pro(n) 1 1S, 1E tractor monoplane 1,2,3,110
   1910 Monoplane Light Type Monoplane 1910  Proto 1 1S, 1E tractor monoplane 1,2,3
   Mercury I  1911  Proto 1 2S, 1E tractor monoplane 1,2,,3,111
  A Unknown (Possibly one of the Mercury aircraft)      
  B Mercury II  1911  Proto 2 1S, 1E tractor monoplane 1,2,3,112
   Mercury III (Mercury Passenger Type) 1911  Prdn 6 2S, 1E tractor monoplane 1,2,3
  C Unknown (Possibly one of the Mercury aircraft)      
  D   1913  ?? ?? 1S, 1E monoplane (1)
  E   1912  Proto 2 1/2S, 1E tractor monoplane 1,2,3
   Military Type E  1912  Proj 0 Projected military dev. of the Type E 2-seater 1,2,3
   1912 Monoplane  1912  Proto 1 1S, 1E tractor monoplane 1,2,3,47,113
  F   1913  Proj 0 2S, 1E Hydro-biplane (1)
  G   1913  ?? ?? 1E monoplane (1)
  H Unknown       
  I   1913  Prdn 2 2S, 1E tractor monoplane 1,2,3,114
  1913 Hydro-Biplane  1913  Proj 0 2S, 1E Hydro-biplane 1,2
   Improved Type I  1914  Proto 1 2S, 1E tractor monoplane 1,2,3
   1914 Seaplane  1914  Proj 0 2S, 1E tractor seaplane derivative of Type I (1)
  J Unknown (Possibly one of the Type I variants)      
  K Unknown (Possibly one of the Type I variants)      
  L   1914  Proto 1 2S, 1E Hydro-biplane 1,2,3,5,115
  1914 Hydro-Biplane  1914  Proj 0 2S, 1E Hydro-biplane - an enlarged Type L (1),2
   T.B. Twin Backburn 1914  Prdn 9 2S, 2E seaplane Zeppelin killer 1,5,6
   Land Sea Monoplane  1915  Proto  (1) 2S, 1E tractor monoplane; optional wheel/float uc 1,2,5
   White Falcon  1915  Proto 1 1S, 1E tractor monoplane 1,5
   G.P.  1916  Proto 1 3S, 2E General Purpose seaplane 1,5
   S.P.  1916  Proto 1 3S, 2E General Purpose seaplane 1,5
   Triplane  1916  Proto 1 1S, 1E pusher triplane scout 1,5
   N.1B  1917 N.1(b) Pro(n)  1S, 1E pusher biplane flying boat 1,5
   Blackburd  1918  Proto 3 1S, 1E shipborne torpedo carrier 1,5,6,52,53
   Sidecar  1918  Proto 1 2S, 1E light aircraft 1,20,22

The Mission Designation System                                       (*CIN = Chronology Index Number.  Note this is not a Blackburn numbering but just an indexing used by this site for convenience.)

CIN*

Type No

Name

Alternative Name(s)

Year

Spec

Status

Qty

Description

References

1

 R.T.1 Kangaroo  1918  Prdn 23 3S, 2E reconnaissance bomber 1,5,6,17,2049,81,116,

2

 T.1 Swift I  1920  Prdn 8 1S, 1E carrier based torpedo bomber 1,20

3

 T.2 Dart  1921 3/20 (DoR Type 8) Prdn 120 1S, 1E carrier based torpedo bomber 1,67,97,118

4

 R.1 Blackburn  1922 3/21 (DoR Type 7A) Prdn 62 3S, 1E deck-landing reconnaissance biplane 1,20

5

 T.1A Swift II, Swift F  1922 

See T.1 Swift I

6

  Chilean Type A  1923  Proj 0 2E flying boat (1)

7

 ?? Swift IV  1923  Proj 0 3S, 1E fleet spotter 1

8

 C.A.0  BN-8 1923  Proj 0 1E, 8 passenger transport (1)

9

 C.A.01  BN-10 1923  Proj 0 1E, 10 passenger transport (1)

10

 C.A.02   1923  Proj 0 3E Cubaroo transport derivative (1)

11

 C.A.03   1923  Proj 0 3S, 1E land or seaplane transport (1)

12

 C.A.1 Unknown      

13

 C.A.2   1923  Proj 0 3E, 8 passenger commercial biplane (1)

14

 C.Bo.1  B.L.6 1923  Proj 0 1E, medium range 6 passenger flying boat (1)

15

 C.Bo.2  B.R.5 1923  Proj 0 1E, medium range 5 passenger flying boat (1)

16

 T.O.1   1923  Proj 0 3S, 1E carrier based torpedo bomber for Sweden 1

17

 M.1 Night Mailplane Swift M.1 1923  Proj 0 1S, 1E mailplane based on the T.1 Swift (1)

18

 T.1B Swift III  1923  Proj 0 1S, 1E amphibious torpedo bomber 1

19

  10-Seater  1923  Proj 0 1E, 10 passenger airliner 1

20

  Pellet  1923  Proto 1 1S, 1E racing seaplane 1,20,98

21

 T.4 Cubaroo  1924 16/22 (DoR Type 9) Proto 2 4S, 1E coastal defence aircraft 1

22

 C.Bo.3   1924  Proj 0 1E, 6 passenger flying boat (1)

23

 C.Bo.4   1924  Proj 0 3E biplane flying boat (1)

24

 L.1 Bluebird  1924  Prdn 78 2S, 1E touring and training biplane 1,16,20,22,64,117,121

25

 C.A.04   1924  Proj 0 3E transport studies with 8 to 24 passengers (1)

26

 C.A.05   1924  Proj 0 4S, 1E touring land or seaplane (1)

27

 C.A.3   1924  Proj 0 3E, 14 passenger commercial biplane (1)

28

 C.A.4   1924  Proj 0 3E, 14 long range version of C.A.3 (1)

29

 C.A.5   1924  Proj 0 3E, 14 long range version of C.A.3 (1)

30

 C.A.6   1924  Proj 0 3E, 8 passenger commercial biplane (1)

31

 C.A.7   1924  Proj 0 1E, 4 passenger biplane (1)

32

 C.A.8   1924  Proj 0 1E, 4 passenger monoplane (1)

33

 T.3 Velos  1925  Prdn 21 2S, 1E torpedo bomber and trainer for Greece 1,20,139

34

 R.2 Airedale  1925 37/22 Proto 2 3S, 1E deck landing reconnaissance monoplane 1

35

 R.3A Airedale  1926  Proj 0 3S, 1E deck landing reconnaissance biplane 1

36

 T.5 Ripon  1926 21/23 Proto 97 (15) 2S, 1E torpedo reconnaissance bomber 1,30,40

37

 T.R.1 Sprat  1926 5/24 Proto 1 2S, 1E deck landing trainer 1,79,119

38

 R.B.1 Iris   1926 R.14/24 Prdn 5 5S, 3E reconnaissance flying boat 1,39

39

 S.1   1927  Proj 0 1E survey biplane (1)

40

 T.4A Cubaroo  1927 

See T.4 Cubaroo

41

 T.4B Cubaroo  1927 

See T.4 Cubaroo

42

 T.4C Cubaroo  1927 

See T.4 Cubaroo

43

 T.6   1927  Proj 0 Enlarged Ripon for Japan (1)

44

 T.7   1927  Proj 0 Enlarged Ripon for Japan (1)

45

 F.1 Turcock Blackcock 1927 F.9/26, N.21/26 Proto 1 1S, 1E fighter 1

46

 B.T.1 Beagle  1928 23/25, 24/25 Proto 1 2S, 1E day bomber, recce/torpedo bomber 1

47

 C.A.10   1928  Proj 0 3E commecial landplane (1)

48

 C.A.9   1928  Proj 0 1E, 8 passenger commercial biplane (1)

49

 F.2 Lincock  1928  Proto 7 1S, 1E light fighter 1

50

    1928 M.5/28 Proj 0 2S, 1E torpedo reconnaissance bomber (1)

51

 2F.1 Nautilus  1929 O.22/26 Proto 1 2S, 1E, fleet spotter / interceptor 1,58

52

 C.A.11   1929  Proj 0 1E, 4 passenger land or sea monoplane (1)

53

 C.A.12   1929  Proj 0 4E, 23-38 passenger monoplane transport (1)

54

 C.A.13   1929  Proj 0 3E, 10-12 passenger monoplane transport (1)

55

 C.A.14   1929  Proj 0 4E, 17 passenger monoplane transport (1)

56

 C.A.15A   1929  Proj 0 3E, 11 passenger monoplane or biplane transport 1

57

 C.A.15B   1929 18/28  Proj 0 3E, 9 passenger monoplane or biplane transport 1,17

58

 R.B.2A   1929  Proj 0 Projected development of R.B.2 Sydney (1)

59

 T.7A   1929  Proj 0 T.7 variant for Spain (1)

60

 T.7B  3MR4 1929  Proto 1 3S, 1E carrier attack bombe 1

61

 T.C.1   1929 C.16/28 Proj 0 3E high wing troop carrier (1)

62

 C.A.11A   1930  Proj 0 6/7 seat variant of C.A.11 (1)

63

 C.A.16   1930  Proj 0 3E, 12 passenger biplane transport (1)

64

 C.A.17   1930  Proj 0 3E, 9 passenger biplane transport (1)

65

 R.B.2 Sydney  1930 R.5/27 Proto 1 5S, 3E maritime reconnaissance flying boat 1

66

 C.B.2 Nile  1930  Pro(n) 1 3E, 14 passenger flying boat 1,17,120

67

 C.B.2F Nile  1930  Proj 0 3E, 14 passenger flying boat 1

68

    1931  Proj 0 6E civil flying boat 17

69

 C.A.18 Segrave I  1931 

 See B.1 Segrave

70

 C.A.18/1 Segrave Ambulance  1931  Proj 0 Ambulance version of C.A.18 (1)

71

 C.A.18A Segrave High Tourer  1931  Proj 0 High performance version of C.A.18 (1)

72

 C.B.1   1931  Proj 0 14-28 pass. flying boat based on the Iris IV (1)

73

    1931 21/28 Proj 0 2S, 1E mailplane 1

74

 C.A.15C   1932 6/29 Proto 2 2E, 10 passenger biplane or monoplane airliner 1,17,20

75

 C.A.19/1 H.S.T.8  1932  Proj 0 2E passenger monoplane transport (1)

76

 C.A.20 Segrave II B.1 1932 

 See B.1 Segrave

77

 C.A.20A Segrave II  1932  Proj 0 Re-engined version of C.A.20 (1)

78

 C.A.21   1932  Proj 0 2/4E, 8 passenger transport/survey monoplane (1)

79

 T.8 Baffin  1933 4/33,  17/34 Prdn 29 (64) 2S, 1E torpedo reconnaissance bomber 1,40

80

 R.B.3 Iris VI  1933  Proto  (1) Iris V with 37mm C.O.W. cannon 1

81

 C.A.19 Segrave III  1933  Proj 0 2E, 8 or 12 passenger monoplane transport 1

82

 T.9 Shark I B.6 1933 S.15/33

 See B.6 Shark

83

 R.B.3A Perth  1933 20/32 Prdn 4 5S, 3E reconnaissance flying boat 1,39

84

 F.3   1934 F.7/30 (OR.1) Pro(n) 1 1S, 1E biplane fighter 1,23

85

 C.A.21B H.S.B.T.10  1935  Proj 0 2E coastal reconnaissance bomber (1)

86

 T.9A Shark II B.6 1935 13/35

 See B.6 Shark

87

 C.A.21A H.S.T.10 B.9 1936 

 See B.9 HST.10

88

 D.B.1 Skua B.24 1937 O.27/34

 See B.24 Skua

89

 T.9B Shark III B.6 1937 19/36

 See B.6 Shark

The B Series

Project No

Type No

Name

Alternative Name(s)

Year

Spec

Status

Qty

Description

References

  B.1 Segrave C.A.18, C.A.20 1931  Prdn 3 4S, 2E touring monoplane 1,16,17,20,78,122
  B.2  Bluebird V 1931  Prdn 42 2S, 1E trainer 1,16,20
  B.3   1932 M.1/30 Proto 2 2S, 1E torpedo reconnaissance bomber 1
  B.4 Ripon V T.5J 1932 

 See T.5 Ripon

  B.5 Ripon V T.5J 1932 

 See T.5 Ripon

  B.6 Shark T.9 1933 S.15/33, S.12/34 Prdn 253 3S, 1E torpedo reconnaissance bomber 1,24,37,92,93,95,124
  B.7   1934 G.4/31 (OR.2) Proto 1 2/3S, 1E gneral purpose biplane 1,28,125
  B.8   1934  Proj 0 2S light aircraft (1)
     1934 R.2/33 (OR.8) Proj 0 4E long range flying boat (1)
  B.9 H.S.T.10 C.A.21A 1936  Pro(n) 1 2E, 12 passenger transport 1,17,41,123
   H.S.T.20  1935  Proj 0 2E long range bomber (1)
   H.B.N.T.10  1935  Proj 0 2E coastal reconnaissance bomber (1)
  B.10 Bluebird IV   1935 

 See L.1 Bluebird

  B.11 Sparrowhawk  1936  Proj 0 Details unknown (1)
  B.12 Not Used       
  B.13 Not Used       
  B.14 Not Used       
  B.15 Not Used       
  B.16 Not Used       
  B.17 Not Used       
  B.18 Not Used       
  B.19 Not Used       
  B.20   1940 R.1/36 (OR.32) Proto 1 4S, 2E reconnaissance flying boat 1,9,11,15,29,70,80,94,136
  B.21   1937 S.24/37 (OR.53) Proj 0 Torpedo bomber reconnaissance aircraft 9
  B.22   1937 S.30/37 Proj 0 2E fleet spotter recce aircraft based on C.A.21B (1)
  B.23 Botha II  1938  Proj 0 4S, 2E reconnaissance torpedo bomber (1)
  B.24 Skua   D.B.1 1937 O.27/34, 25/36 Prdn 192 2S, 1E dive bomber 1,9,50,54,62,72,101,126
     1935 A.39/34 Proj 0 2S, 1E fleet turret fighter based on B.24 1
     1935 R.12/35 (OR.21) Proj 0 4E high performance flying boat. (1)
      M.15/35 (OR.22) Proj 0 2E shore based torpedo bomber (9)
     1935 G.24/35 (OR.25) Proj 0 2E general purpose recconnaissance landplane (9)
    B.B.5 1936  Proj 0 5S, 2E naval amphibian (1)
  B.25 Roc  1938 O.30/35, O.15/37 Prdn 136 2S, 1E fleet turret fighter 1,9,13,35,51,62,101
  B.26 Botha  1938 10/36 (OR.29) Prdn 580 4S, 2E reconnaissance torpedo bomber 1,9,34,59,60,88,89,96,138
  B.27 Botha II  1938  Proj 0 4S, 2E reconnaissance torpedo bomber  (1)
  B.28   1940 B.3/40 (OR.80) Proj 0 2E light bomber 9,11
  B.29   1939 S.24/37 (OR.53) Proj 0 1E torpedo bomber reconnaissance aircraft 1,9
  B.30   1939 B.1/39 Proj 0 4E bomber 9
  B.31   1939 N.9/39 Proj 0 2S, 1E fleet turret fighter 9
  B.32   1939 R.5/39 (OR.69) Proj 0 Flying boat 9
  B.33   1939 N.8/39 Proj 0 Naval fighter 9
  B.34   1939 A.7/39 (OR.70) Proj 0 Army co-operation aircraft (1)
  B.35  B.P.1 1938  Proj 0 1S, 1E deck landing amphibian fighter (1)
  B.36   1938 S.24/37 (OR.53) Proj 0 1E torpedo bomber reconnaissance aircraft 9
  B.37 Firebrand I & II  1940 N.11/40 (OR.88) Prdn 223 1S, 1E shipborne fighter / torpedo fighter 1,9,36,38,42,48,56,57,63,71,73,91,99,105,108,127
  B.38   1940  Proj 0 Amphibian flying boat (1)
  B.39   1940 R.5/39 (OR.69) Proj 0 2E long range reconnaissance flying boat 9
  B.40   1940  Proj 0 4S, 2E reconnaissance flying boat 9,11,29
  B.41   1940  Proj 0 1S, 1E fighter (1)
  B.42  1942  Proj 0 B.37 with high lift wing (1)
  B.43  1942  Proj 0 1S, 1E seaplane fighter (1)
  B.44   1943 N.2/42 (OR.114) Proj 0 1S, 1E seaplane fighter 1,9,11,25,29
  B.45 Firebrand III  1943 S.8/43 (OR.124)

 See B.37 Firebrand

  B.46 Firebrand Mk.4 & 5  1945 

 See B.37 Firebrand

  B.47   1944 O.5/43 (OR.144) Proj 0 Dive bomber 9
  B.48  Y.A.1, (Firecrest) 1947 S.28/43 (OR.150) Proto 2 1S, 1E shipborne torpedo fighter 1,8,9,46,69,82,105,108
  B.49 Clydesman  1945  Proj 0 6E 160 passenger large flying boat 1,21,83,135
  B.49B Clydesman  1945  Proj 0 Tandem wing version of B.49 21
  B.50   1945  Proj 0 1E jet naval strike aircraft 7
  B.51   1945  Proj 0 5S, 1E light transport (1)
  B.52   1945 T.7/45 (OR.159) Proj 0 2S, 1E trainer (1)
  B.53Torpedo Research  1945  n/a n/a  n/a
  B.54  Y.A.5, Y.A.7, Y.A.8 1949 GR.17/45 (OR.220) Proto 2 2/3S, 1E torpedo / anti-submarine bomber 1,7
  B.55  Y.A.4 1946  Proj 0 24 passenger, 4E airliner 1
  B.56 Not Used       
  B.57 Not Used       
  B.58 Not Used       
  B.59 Not Used       
  B.60   1946  Proj 0 2E civil transport (1)
  B.61   1946  Proj 0 Naval strike aircraft (1),(8)
  B.62  Y.A.6 1946  Proj 0 Projected turbine development of B.48 (1)
  B.63   1946  Proj 0 High speed transport (1)
  B.64Torpedo Research  1946  n/a n/a  n/a
  B.65   1946 8/46 (OR.222) Proj 0 20 passenger, 2E airliner 1
  B.66   1946  Proj 0 Transonic delta 8
  B.67   1946 N.40/46 Proj 0 Night fighter 7
  B.68   1946  Proj 0 Naval fighter (1)
  B.69   1946  Proj 0 64 passenger, 4E airliner (1)
  B.70   1947 2/47 Proj 0 4E medium range transport 1
  B.71   1947  Proj 0 Experimental naval aircraft (1)
  B.72   1947  Proj 0 Short range transport (1)
  B.73A   1947 5/48 Proj 0 4E, 48-100 pass, double-deck long range transport 21
  B.73B   1947 5/48 Proj 0 4E 40-60 pass single deck long range transport 21
  B.73C   1947 5/48 Proj 0 4E 32 pass long range transport 21
  B.74   1947 N.9/47 (OR.254) Proj 0 Naval fighter aircraft (1)
  B.75  Y.A.9 1947  Proj 0 2E, 4-8 passenger feeder-liner (1)
  B.76   1948  Proj 0 Commercial freighter (1)
  B.77A   1948  Proj 0 4E, 14 passenger light airliner (1)
  B.77B   1948  Proj 0 4E, 14 passenger light airliner 4
  B.77C   1948  Proj 0 4E, 12 passenger light airliner (1)
  B.78   1948 R.2/48 (OR.231/2) Proj 0 Reconnaissance flying boat 8,9
  B.79   1949  Proj 0 Anti-submarine aircraft (1),(8)
     1949  Proj 0 1S, 1E v.g. supersonic research aircraft 68
  B.80   1949 T.16/48 (OR.257) Proj 0 2S, 1E basic trainer 4
  B.81   1949  Proj 0 Naval reconnaissance aircraft (1)
  B.82   1949 N.14/49 Proj 0 2S, 2E naval night fighter (1)
  B.83   1949 M.123D (NA.32) Proj 0 3S, 1E naval recce/anti-submarine aircraft 4,8
  B.83A   1949  Proj 0 3S, 1E naval recce/anti-submarine aircraft (1)
  B.84   1949 26/49 Proj 0 4E light airliner 4
  B.84A   1949 26/49 Proj 0 4E 18/20-seat light airliner 1
  B.84B   1949 26/49 Proj 0 4E 12/14-seat light airliner (1)
  B.84C   1949 26/49 Proj 0 4E 17-seat light airliner (1)
     1949 X.30/46 (OR.201) Proj 0 General purpose glider (12)
  B.85   1950  Proj 0 Composite aircraft (1)
  B.86   1950  Proj 0 Coastal Command aircraft (1)
  B.87   1950  Proj 0 Training aircraft (1)
     1950 E.16/49 Proj 0 1S, 1E v.g. supersonic research aircraft 68
  B.88  Y.B.1 1950 GR.17/45 (OR.220) Proto 1 2/3S, 1E torpedo / anti-submarine bomber 1,8
  B.89   1950 N.114T (NA.14) Proj 0 2S, 1E naval fighter 4,7,8,32
  B.90   1951 ER.110T Proj 0 1S, 1E v.g. supersonic research aircraft 4,7,31,68
  B.91   1951 M.123D Proj 0 3S, 1E light general recce/anti-submarine aircraft 8
  B.92   1950  Proj 0 Jet trainer (1)
  B.92A   1950  Proj 0 1E basic trainer derived from B.92 (1)
  B.92B   1950  Proj 0 2E basic trainer derived from B.92 4
  B.93 Highlander  1951  Proj 0 5S, 2E feeder airliner 1,4
  B.94   1951  Proj 0 2S, 1E undercarriageless naval fighter 4,7
  B.95   1951  Proj 0 2S, 1E naval fighter 7
  B.96   1952  Proj 0 Development of Y.B.1 (1),(8)
  B.97